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The Critical Judgments Project

The Critical Judgments Project

Re-reading Monis v The Queen

Edited by Gabrielle Appleby and Rosalind Dixon

CONTENTSREVIEWS

BRODLIM x JULIEN RAYNAUD
Le Penseur 2015
Kashmiri embroidery
80 cm X 80 cm
Reproduced with permission of the artist, Julien Raynaud and BRODLIM
© BRODLIM & Julien Raynaud
www.brodlim.com
www.julienraynaudart.com

______________________________________

This book introduces students to a number of critical legal perspectives and demonstrates how such perspectives might be used to influence and reimagine existing legal doctrines. It extends the seminal Feminist Judgments Project and adapts it specifically for the purpose of teaching critical legal thinking. Each chapter provides extracts and commentary on the prominent thinkers within the critical discipline before a leading critical scholar rewrites the judgment in the famous 2013 decision of the High Court of Australia, Monis v The Queen, informed and reimagined through this perspective.

The case required the High Court to engage with deep issues about the role of free speech in democracy, the appropriate role of the state in regulating civility of discourse and protecting vulnerable groups, and the ongoing influence of gender and race in approaching these issues. The decision was the first in which the Court split over the relevant issues along gender lines. The saliency of the identity of the judges in the case makes it natural for introducing students to the idea that who judges are, and how they understand notions of constitutional justice, may matter to the resolution of concrete constitutional questions.

The book builds on the seminal work undertaken in the Feminist Judgments Project by pluralising not just the feminist critique, but the wider range of critical perspectives brought to the judicial method. The critical perspectives in this project include feminism and the public–private divide, anti-subordination feminism, critical race theory, queer theory/post-structural feminism, law and literature, political liberalism, intersectional theory, law and economics, restorative justice and deliberative democratic theory.


CONTENTS

Foreword by The Hon Justice Margaret A McMurdo AC
Special Thanks
Acknowledgments
About the Contributors
Table of Cases
Table of Statutes

1. Critical Thinking in Constitutional Law and Monis v The Queen
             Gabrielle Appleby and Rosalind Dixon

2. Law and Literature – Analysing Style in Judgment Writing
             Gabrielle Appleby and Heather Roberts

3. Feminism and the Public-Private Divide
             Margaret Thornton

4. Anti-Subordination Feminism
             Beth Gaze

5. Queer Theory and Poststructuralist Feminism
             Anne Macduff and Wayne Morgan

6. Critical Race Theory and the Constitutionality of Hate Speech Regulation
             Katharine Gelber

7. Intersectional Theory: Where Gender Meets Race, Ethnicity and Violence
             Megan Davis

8. An International Human Rights Law Perspective
             Andrew Byrnes

9. A Capabilities Approach
             Rosalind Dixon

10. Political Liberalism
             Denise Meyerson

11. Deliberative Democracy
             Peter Burdon and Alexander Reilly

12. A Restorative Justice Approach
             Melanie Schwartz and Anna Olijnyk

13. Preventive Justice
             Tamara Tulich

14. Law and Economics
             Richard Holden

15. Critical Judging
             Margaret Davies

Index


REVIEWS

The prevailing legal realist school of thought holds that judging involves not merely the application of facts to law but, at least in hard cases, it is also influenced by the values, background and life experiences of each judge hearing the case. On that premise, critiques of judicial decisions are from time to time advanced from perspectives said to differ from those of the judge who decided them.
         This interesting book, inspired by the feminist judgments project, takes this school of thought to a logical conclusion. Associate Professor Gabrielle Appleby and Professor Rosalind Dixon of UNSW have invited a number of leading scholars to draft a seventh judgment for the now infamous High Court case of Monis v The Queen (2013) 249 CLR 92. Each contributor adopts a particular critical viewpoint in drafting his or her “judgment”. The editors justify their choice of the decision in Monis on three bases. First, it involved a difficult constitutional question, namely the application of the doctrine of implied freedom of political communication. Second, the Court was constituted by only six judges and, remarkably, their Honours split 3:3 and along gender lines. Third, the case is of enduring public interest as a result of Mr Monis’ actions in perpetrating the Martin Place siege in 2014, which directly resulted in the death of two innocent hostages. …
         The Critical Judgments Project – Re-reading Monis v The Queen is commendable to anyone interested in understanding the relationship between specific perspectives or theoretical frameworks and judicial reasoning. Its editors challenge us to “identify and assess the influence of personal, social, political and economic factors in the development of legal doctrine”.

Queensland Law Reporter 3 February 2017 [2017] 04 QLR

   

Published 28 October 2016
Publisher The Federation Press
Paperback/272pp
ISBN 9781760020750
Australian RRP $79.95
International Price $75.00
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Law - Constitutional
Law - Culture & Law
Law - Feminist Legal Studies
Law - Gender, Sexuality & the Law
Law - Judges & Courts
Law - Jurisprudence / Legal Theory
Law - Legal Interpretation
Law - Women & the Law


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